REGI GROUP BUSINESS SERVICES.

Foreign LLC

The term "foreign" refers to a US company that is created any where outside a given state, and which whishes to do business is this state. For example, a company that is formed in the state of Delaware in the US would be viewed as a "foreign" company in other states such as the state of Nevada. Similarly, a company formed in the United Kingdom would be "foreign" if whishes to register to do business in the state of Nevada or other state.

Companies that do business in several states within the US have to "foreign qualify" and  must register for a Certificate of Authority in that state and pay the applicable state filing fees.

Documents Required from the State where Company was originally incorporated:


Foreign LLCs Fee Schedule, NON Expedited service. All prices include state and service fees:

State

$

State

$

State

$

State

$

Alabama

165

Illinois

340

Montana

130

Rhode Island

210

Alaska

440

Indiana

210

Nebraska

170

South Carolina

170

Arizona

240

Iowa

160

Nevada

110

South Dakota

610

Arkansas

360

Kansas

270

New Hampshire

160

Tennessee

360

California

160

Kentucky

170

New Jersey

260

Texas

560

Colorado

215

Louisiana

190

New Mexico

260

Utah

120

Connecticut

120

Maine

310

New York

445

Vermont

140

Delaware

190

Maryland

160

North Carolina

310

Virginia

170

DC

260

Massachusetts

560

North Dakota

190

Washington

240

Florida

185

Michigan

120

Ohio

190

West Virginia

220

Georgia

290

Minnesota

250

Oklahoma

360

Wisconsin

160

Hawaii

160

Mississippi

310

Oregon

110

Wyoming

160

Idaho

220

Missouri

170

Pennsylvania

310

 

 


In many States Expedited service is available: 


Recommended Additions to your order:


  • Registered Agent Service - $135 per year /Registered agent is a Legal or Physical person, required (by most states) to have a physical address in the state of company registration/
  • EIN number - $95 /Registration with the Internal Revenue Service, including obtaining a Tax registration number/

Optional Additions to Your Order:


Shipping

UPS  Ground - $7

UPS Overnight - $32

A foreign corporation is an existing corporation that is registered to do business in a jurisdiction (such as a U.S. State, or a country) other than the one where it was originally incorporated. This article uses the word state to refer to separate jurisdictions, as the typical example of a foreign corporation is one that is incorporated in one state of the United States, then is authorized to do business in additional state(s); however, a corporation could be incorporated in one country and authorized to do business in one or more additional countries, depending on whether corporations are registered at the federal level of a country, or at the sub-federal level, such as at the State or Province level of a country. For the purposes of this article, therefore, the term 'state' may also represent 'country' with respect to different jurisdictions.

The use of foreign corporation registration allows a corporation to operate in multiple jurisdictions as the same organization in all of them. The only alternative would be to register a separate corporation in each jurisdiction, and separate every operation according to the particular jurisdiction to which the operations are taking place. This would mean, for example, a corporation operating in 5 U.S. states would have to have separate domestic corporations in each of the five states, as opposed to having a single corporation registered in one state, and being registered as a foreign corporation in the other four.

The two basic ways to organize a corporation which operates in multiple jurisdictions is

  • to operate as a single corporation having one jurisdiction to which it is a domestic corporation and register as a foreign corporation in all other states, or
  • create one primary corporation (or parent corporation that owns the stock of all the other corporations, and each of the other corporations is registered as a domestic corporation in each state it operates. The parent corporation (or parent company) is usually referred to as a holding company, while the separate corporations are referred to as subsidiaries. If the parent corporation owns all of their stock, they would be referred to as wholly owned subsidiaries of the parent company.

Operating a corporation as a holding company and separate corporations in each state, or operating as a single corporation with registrations as foreign corporations in all the other states than its home state, is a matter of choice for the corporation's directors and officers depending on how it operates, damage liability and tax consequences. A corporation may find it more advantageous operating as separate companies in each state or jurisdiction, or it may find that operating as a single organization may make more sense.

One reason for operating as a single corporation having foreign corporation status in other states is because of corporate governance rules which dictate that the rules of the state where the corporation is a domestic corporation apply for certain provisions such as voting rights, officer and director protection, and liability for misconduct. 

One reason for operating as a holding company with separate domestic corporations is because of potential liability issues such as in operating facilities which have high potential liabilities in the event of accident or failure. Thus only the assets of the particular corporation in the particular state are at risk in the event of a lawsuit, as opposed to the assets of the entire corporate entity. In some cases, because of ownership rules, the laws of a jurisdiction may require separate businesses to be operated by subsidiaries in order to protect the business of the subsidiary from the operations of the parent. This is most prevalent in the case of subsidiaries which are banks or public utilities such as electric power companies.




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